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Necrorealism

 
Necrorealism

event site and dates

Moscow Museum of Modern Art, 17 Ermolaevsky lane
13 september 2011 — 30 october 2011

Opening: September 23

Curators: Olesya Turkina

Artists:

  • Evgeny Yufit
  • Vladimir Kustov
  • Sergei Serp
  • Valery Morozov
  • Andrey Mertvy (Kurmayartsev)
  • Leonid Trupyr (Konstantinov)
  • Igor Bezrukov
  • Evgeny Debil (Kondratiev)
  • Anatoly Svirepy (Mortyukov)
  • Yuri Tsirkul (Krasev)

The Necrorealism movement emerged in the early 80s of the 20th century in Leningrad. Its founding father was Evgeny Yufit, an artist and an independent film director. Necrorealism reversed the firmly established in the Soviet tradition attitude to death, which was only recognized as “death for the Motherland”. The first artworks of this movements were staged photographs in “zombie make up” imitating fights and chases, shot against the background of woods, abandoned construction sites, in suburban trains. These films originated parallel cinema in Russia. Yufit set up the first experimental film studio “Mzhalalafilm”, which united independent film makers and artists. Necrorealism was born out of social protest, love of absurdism, black humor, and books on forensic medicine. In 1984 the artists discovered “Atlas of Legal Medicine” by Eduard von Hoffman on forensic pathology. This book was an important impulse for the creation of Necrorealist acting, literature, and painting.

As the object of their aesthetic research, Necrorealists study the offset behavior of a person doomed to death. The artists aim to represent the unrepresentable – death. Paradoxically, the very title “Necrorealism” combines two opposites life and death: realism - living, and necro – dead. The artists received international acclaim in the early 1990s. films, photographs, and paintings by Yufit, artworks by Vladimir Kustov, Sergey Serp, Andrey Mertvy, and sculptures by Valery Morozov were exhibited at the most important art shows of the Perestroika period, such as “In the USSR and Beyond” (1990, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam), “Binational: Soviet Art Around 1990” (1991 Kunsthalle Dusseldorf; Central House of Artists, Moscow; The Israel Museum, Jerusalem), «Kunst Europa» (1991, Kunstverein Hannover).

The Necrorealism exhibition at the Moscow Museum of Modern Art is the first large-scale retrospective of one of the most original art movements which will allow to retrace its development. The show will feature both well-known and new works by the artists, and will present the “necromethod” and the complete iconography of the art group.






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